charlottelabouff: vua2: I’ll never understand people who don’t drink alcohol Maybe they know what alcohol can do to people, maybe they fear liver failure, maybe they had a family member or friend that died from an alcohol related accident, maybe they don’t feel the need or desire to drink, it’s really not that hard to comprehend. (Source: vua, via camiyogaom)

charlottelabouff:

vua2:

I’ll never understand people who don’t drink alcohol

Maybe they know what alcohol can do to people, maybe they fear liver failure, maybe they had a family member or friend that died from an alcohol related accident, maybe they don’t feel the need or desire to drink, it’s really not that hard to comprehend.

(Source: vua, via camiyogaom)

burningbrighterstill:

louie-key:

myinterpretation5:

thethneedler:

EVERYBODY SHOULD READ THIS!!!!!!!!!REBLOG…IT CAN SAVE A LIFE OR TWO!!!WARNING: Some knew about the red light on cars, but not Dialing 112.An UNMARKED police car pulled up behind her and put his lights on. Lauren’s parents have always told her to never pull over for an unmarked car on the side of the road, but rather to wait until they get to a gas station, etc.Lauren had actually listened to her parents advice, and promptly called, 112 on her cell phone to tell the police dispatcher that she would not pull over right away. She proceeded to tell the dispatcher that there was an unmarked police car with a flashing red light on his rooftop behind her. The dispatcher checked to see if there were police cars where she was and there weren’t, and he told her to keep driving, remain calm and that he had back up already on the way. Ten minutes later 4 cop cars surrounded her and the unmarked car behind her. One policeman went to her side and the others surrounded the car behind. They pulled the guy from the car and tackled him to the ground. The man was a convicted rapist and wanted for other crimes.I never knew about the 112 Cell Phone feature. I tried it on my AT&T phone & it said, “Dialing Emergency Number.”Especially for a woman alone in a car, you should not pull over for an unmarked car. Apparently police have to respect your right to keep going on to a safe place.*Speaking to a service representative at Bell Mobility confirmed that 112 was a direct link to State trooper info. So, now it’s your turn to let your friends know about “Dialing, 112”You may want to send this to every Man, Woman & Youngster you know; it may well save a life. This applies to ALL 50 statesPLEASE PASS ALONG TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY, IT CAN SAVE A LIFE….

Works in Canada too guys, just tried it!

Reblogging for anyone of the feminine preference that follow me. (Or for general knowledge.)

thats terrifying 
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thoughtsofablackgirl:

"We decided to take a break from shooting the movie #withthisring yesterday and show our support for#ferguson.” Eve
Anonymous said: may I ask you something, it might be odd and if so forgive me, but you're the only person I know on here who I've encountered that majored in physics, so how do you think like physicists. I ask because I really love physics and studying it but I do very poorly in comparison to my other subjects. if I were better at it I would switch from engineering to physics. thank you for your time. differentialprincess: oh this is a really good question (and not odd at all) and, this is something that I had to learn in college myself. it’s not something I’m learning much of anymore (but it’s still a skill I’m glad I learned some of). and as a first year student I didn’t quite have a grasp on these concepts. I should state that more explicitly: you don’t really ever learn to think like a physicist. it’s a process that is always happening. a good starting point is the Feynman Lectures on Physics, available free at this link the lectures are from when Feynman taught introductory physics for first years at Caltech, and they are an exceptional resource for learning the basics and getting a qualitative feel for a good way to think about physics. there are some other things that I personally have noticed from learning physics. im going to avoid talking about computational tips because I don’t know a lot of those and because some of those are advanced and tricky, but computational skills are important. 1) estimation is important. somewhere feynman mentions something about knowing what the solution to a problem will look like before computing the solution. say: how many bars of soap are used in the united states each year? I have no idea. but an average number depends on simple things: the population of the US, the percentage of the population that uses bars of soap, the average number of soap bars they purchase in a year, and so on. from there you can actually just. guess at some of the unknown numbers, and you will get a good order of magnitude estimate. then it might be possible to really do the problem with known statistics, and use your estimate as a guess. sometimes it’s hard to get an estimate a priori and then you just have to do the calculation, but if you can, it really helps. 2) familiarity is helpful. one of my professors phrased this as “you should know something about the place you live” in reference to the fact that our class didn’t know that the earth was 40 million meters in circumference let’s not talk about the other multitude of various physical constants I have memorized, sometimes to a terrifying number of decimal places, like h = 6.626E-34 J s this sort of familiarity is an extension of 1) and knowing what the general size of things is 3) draw pictures. okay, yes, you can’t really do this in quantum mechanics, but when you can draw pictures they are incredibly helpful. a good picture can often solve your problem for you. especially important here is the idea of symmetry the symmetry in a problem often can solve things for you (ex: what’s the net gravitational force on a particle at the center of the earth?) but be careful: sometimes you can draw a picture incorrectly and get incorrect information. so be sure to draw an accurate picture (draw big it helps) finally: good luck, have fun! :D

Anonymous said: may I ask you something, it might be odd and if so forgive me, but you're the only person I know on here who I've encountered that majored in physics, so how do you think like physicists. I ask because I really love physics and studying it but I do very poorly in comparison to my other subjects. if I were better at it I would switch from engineering to physics. thank you for your time.

differentialprincess:

oh this is a really good question (and not odd at all)

and, this is something that I had to learn in college myself. it’s not something I’m learning much of anymore (but it’s still a skill I’m glad I learned some of). and as a first year student I didn’t quite have a grasp on these concepts.

I should state that more explicitly: you don’t really ever learn to think like a physicist. it’s a process that is always happening.

a good starting point is the Feynman Lectures on Physics, available free at this link

the lectures are from when Feynman taught introductory physics for first years at Caltech, and they are an exceptional resource for learning the basics and getting a qualitative feel for a good way to think about physics.

there are some other things that I personally have noticed from learning physics. im going to avoid talking about computational tips because I don’t know a lot of those and because some of those are advanced and tricky, but computational skills are important.

1) estimation is important. somewhere feynman mentions something about knowing what the solution to a problem will look like before computing the solution.

say: how many bars of soap are used in the united states each year?

I have no idea. but an average number depends on simple things: the population of the US, the percentage of the population that uses bars of soap, the average number of soap bars they purchase in a year, and so on.

from there you can actually just. guess at some of the unknown numbers, and you will get a good order of magnitude estimate. then it might be possible to really do the problem with known statistics, and use your estimate as a guess.

sometimes it’s hard to get an estimate a priori and then you just have to do the calculation, but if you can, it really helps.

2) familiarity is helpful. one of my professors phrased this as “you should know something about the place you live” in reference to the fact that our class didn’t know that the earth was 40 million meters in circumference

let’s not talk about the other multitude of various physical constants I have memorized, sometimes to a terrifying number of decimal places, like h = 6.626E-34 J s

this sort of familiarity is an extension of 1) and knowing what the general size of things is

3) draw pictures. okay, yes, you can’t really do this in quantum mechanics, but when you can draw pictures they are incredibly helpful. a good picture can often solve your problem for you.

especially important here is the idea of symmetry

the symmetry in a problem often can solve things for you (ex: what’s the net gravitational force on a particle at the center of the earth?)

but be careful: sometimes you can draw a picture incorrectly and get incorrect information. so be sure to draw an accurate picture (draw big it helps)

finally: good luck, have fun! :D